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War Games pioneered a whole visual language of people talking to and through computers, and that language still gets used today, whenever computer users in films read their screens out loud for the audience's benefit, saying what they're typing as the camera aggressively cuts to extreme close-ups of key words onscreen. When users first log on, the site initiates a primitive chat session, calling them by name and asking questions like "Do you want to hurt me?More recent films usually have a live person on both ends of a chat-line, both of them reciting whatever they type; War Games instead had a tinned, eerily inhuman computerized voice simulator speaking for the world-threatening mainframe. Attempts to make computer communication exciting and cinematic have gone downhill ever since. Jumpin' Jack Flash (1986)"Computers are not friendly! " A woman's seductive voice echoes everything the website says in print, but the filmmakers mostly avoid having the users respond out loud by limiting their sides of the conversation to brief questions, short and simple enough to be read off the screen.She felt as if she had been handed the key to a great house she hadn't known was there, a house that was somehow inside her, and as she turned the key, deep in the darkness of the building she felt other doors opening too, and lights coming on.She sat trembling, hugging her knees, hardly daring to breathe...

There are also some differences between the UK and US editions of the books.The most significant change is perhaps the omission/amendment of a couple of passages in the US edition of the books. As Mary said that, Lyra felt something strange happen to her body.She felt a stirring at the roots of her hair: she found herself breathing faster.(The name Pullman refers to George Pullman, who introduced lavish dining cars to US trains in 1868.) As I nibble my salmon starter (£10), I reflect that there can be few more civilised pleasures known to mobile man than enjoying good, freshly cooked food against a backdrop of ever-changing scenery.It certainly helps pass a journey in a way that a novel or newspaper can't – and every human needs to eat, so trains have a captive audience.